directed by Victor Fleming
USA 1939

David O. Selznick wanted Gone with the Wind to be somehow more than a movie, a film that would broaden the very idea of what a film could be and do and look like. In many respects he got what he worked so hard to achieve in this 1939 epic (and all-time box-office champ in terms of tickets sold), and in some respects he fell far short of the goal. While the first half of this Civil War drama is taut and suspenseful and nostalgic, the second is ramshackle and arbitrary. But there's no question that the film is an enormous achievement in terms of its every resource--art direction, color, sound, cinematography--being pushed to new limits for the greater glory of telling an American story as fully as possible. Vivien Leigh is still magnificently narcissistic, Olivia de Havilland angelic and lovely, Leslie Howard reckless and aristocratic. As for Clark Gable: we're talking one of the most vital, masculine performances ever committed to film.

Tom Keogh's description from Amazon's website HERE

Posters

Theatrical Release: December 15th, 1939 - Atlanta, Georgia

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DVD Review: Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC

DVD Box Cover

   

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Distribution Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC
Runtime 1:48:04 (Disc1) + 2:04:52 (Disc 2)
Video 1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 6.91 mb/s (both discs)
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

(Disc 1)

Bitrate:

(Disc2)

Audio English (Dolby Digital 5.1), original track (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), DUB: French (Dolby Digital 5.1)
Subtitles English, Spanish, French, None
Features

Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Original aspect Ratio 1.33:1

Edition Details:

•  Commentary by film historian Rudy Behlmer
•  Ultra-Resolution film restoration
•  "The Making of a Legend: Gone With The Wind" the 1989 documentary made by Selznick's sons (125 Minutes)
•  "Restoring a Legend" - An in-depth look at the restoration
•  Footage from 1939 Atlanta and 1961 Civil War Centennial Atlanta premieres
•  "The Old South" - 1940 theatrical short directed by Fred Zinnerman
•  "Melanie Remembers: Olivia de Havilland Recalls Gone With The Wind" - All new documentary
•  "Clark Gable: A King Remembered"
•  "Vivien Leigh: Scarlett and Beyond"
•  Mini documentaries covering lives and careers of the most prominent cast members
•  Prologue from the international release version
•  Trailer gallery
•  Number of discs: 4 

 

Specifically: (Disc 1 + 2 are the film with optional commentary)

 

DVD Features: Disc 3
• The Making of a Legend: Gone With The Wind the acclaimed 1989 documentary made by Selznick's sons and narrated by Christopher Plummer (125 Minutes, Never-before-available on DVD)
• Restoring a Legend- An in-depth look at the restoration and Ultra-Resolution process utilized by Warner Bros. For this new DVD presentation
• Footage from 1939 Atlanta and 1961 Civil War Centennial Atlanta premieres
• The Old South - Fred Zinnerman directed this historical 1940 theatrical short, which was shown by MGM in theatres prior to the release of Gone With The Wind

DVD Features: Disc 4
• Melanie Remembers: Olivia de Havilland Recalls Gone With The Wind - All new documentary produced especially for this new DVD set, features Ms. de Havilland's personal recollections of the film
• Clark Gable: A King Remembered - A Portrait of the legendary actor's long and distinguished career as M-G-M's most famous leading man
• Vivien Leigh: Scarlett and Beyond hosted by Jessica Lange, this is an insightful look at Leigh's short and troubled life
• Mini documentaries covering lives and careers of the most prominent cast members

DVD Release Date: November 9th, 2004

Keep Case
Chapters: 31 + 32 = 63

 

 

Comments:

I had never owned this film on DVD before or we would have done a comparison with the older and alt-region versions. I'm told the biggest difference is in the color. Warner Brother’s proprietary “Ultra Restoration” process was used to restore this (Technicolor) film... and it looks flawless. "Made in 1939"? - right - it looks like it was filmed yesterday. Contrast is top notch, black levels are pitch... there is some VERY minor edge enhancement (10X zoom to see!), audio is exemplary (original and 5.1 offered).... and the extensive extras speak for themselves. As the film is a keystone of the Warner empire, they appeared to spare no expense and Warner is one of the few DVD Production studios that has the ability to pump large cash into the creation of a DVD. Essentially, this is reference material for showing the capabilities of older films on DVD (for silent films, I might say "City Lights") - this is probably even superior (well audio is, we know) to the original theatrical presentation. What I am saying is this DVD package is going to be in contention for DVD of the Year!... and it may win! out of        

Gary W. Tooze

 





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Gary Tooze