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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka "The Leopard" or "Le Guépard")

directed by Luchino Visconti
Italy / France 1963

Criterion product description: Making its long-awaited U.S. home video debut, Luchino Visconti’s The Leopard (Il Gattopardo) is an epic on the grandest possible scale. The film recreates, with nostalgia, drama, and opulence, the tumultuous years of Italy’s Risorgimento—when the aristocracy lost its grip and the middle classes rose and formed a unified, democratic Italy. Burt Lancaster stars as the aging prince watching his culture and fortune wane in the face of a new generation, represented by his upstart nephew (Alain Delon) and his beautiful fiancée (Claudia Cardinale). Awarded the Palme d’Or at the 1963 Cannes Film Festival, The Leopard translates Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s novel, and the history it recounts, into a truly cinematic masterpiece. The Criterion Collection is proud to present the film in two distinct versions: Visconti’s original Italian version, and the alternate English-language version released in America in a newly restored special edition.

***

Italian director Luchino Visconti delivers one of his most ambitious works with this sprawling historical drama. Based on the acclaimed novel by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, THE LEOPARD is set in Sicily during the 1800s, as the aristocracy found itself being suffocated by a newly democratic fervor. Prince Don Fabrizio Salina (Burt Lancaster) tries to hold on to the past, but it appears that his glory days are waning. This is perfectly exemplified by his nephew Tancredi Falconeri (Alain Delon) and his gorgeous wife-to-be Angelica (Claudia Cardinale). As the revolt gathers steam and begins to affect a real change, the aging prince must come to terms with the new world that surrounds him. With THE LEOPARD, Visconti confirms his status as one of Europe's most masterful directors, particularly with the 45 minute ballroom scene.

Theatrical Release: March 28th, 1963 - Italy

Reviews        More Reviews       DVD Reviews

Comparison:

BFI - Region 2- PAL vs. Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC vs. Medusa - Region 2 - PAL vs. BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray vs. Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Big thanks to Ole Kofoed for the DVD Screen Caps!

1) BFI - Region 2 - PAL LEFT

2) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - SECOND

3) Medusa - Region 2 - PAL - THIRD

4) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray FOURTH

5) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray RIGHT

Box Covers

 

Distribution BFI
Region 2 - PAL

Criterion Collection

Region 1 - NTSC

Medusa
Region 2 - PAL
BFI
Region 'B' -
Blu-ray

Criterion Collection - Spine #235

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Runtime 2:57:48 (4% PAL speedup) 3:05:54 2:57:42 (4% PAL speedup) 3:05:48 3:05:51.265
Video

2.21:1 Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 5.47 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

2.21:1 Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 5.33 mb/s
NTSC 704x480 29.97 f/s

2.35:1 Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 5.99 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 42,034,842,608 bytes

Feature: 39,164,430,336 bytes

Video Bitrate: 24.69 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 48,362,408,535 bytes

Feature: 47,573,385,216 bytes

Video Bitrate: 30.02 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

B F I DVD

Bitrate:

Criterion

 

Bitrate:

 

Medusa

 

Bitrate:

 

BFI Blu-ray (original)

 

Bitrate:

 

BFI Blu-ray (reissue)

 

Bitrate:

 

Criterion Blu-ray

 

Audio Italian (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono) Italian (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)

Italian (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)

LPCM Audio Italian 1536 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1536 kbps / 16-bit
Dolby Digital Audio English 320 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 320 kbps
LPCM Audio Italian 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps
Subtitles English or Commentary Subtitles or none. English or none. English, Italian or none. (Extras is only subtitled in Italian) English (HoH), English or none English or none
Features Release Information:
Studio: BFI Video

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.21:1

Edition Details:
• Full Feature Commentary by David

Forgacs and Rossana Capitano (optional subtitles)
• Interview with Claudia Cardinale (optional English subtitles)
• Director Biography
• Trailer

• 1 page sleeve notes by David Forgacs
 

DVD Release Date: September 27th, 2004
Transparent Keep Case

Chapters 25

 

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.21:1

Edition Details:
• New transfer of of the 161-minute American release, with English-language dialogue (including Burt Lancaster's actual voice)
• Audio commentary by film scholar Peter Cowie
• A Dying Breed, a new hour-long documentary featuring interviews with Claudia Cardinale, screenwriter Suso Ceccho D'Amico, cinematographer Guiseppe Rotunno, Sydney Pollack, and many others
• Interview with professor Millicent Marcus on the history behind The Leopard
• Interview with producer Goffredo Lombardo
• Stills gallery of rare behind-the-scenes production photos
• Theatrical trailer
• 3-DVD Set

DVD Release Date: June 8, 2004
Keep Case

Chapters 32

Release Information:
Studio: Medusa

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.35:1

Edition Details:
• Interview with producer Goffredo Lombardo (19:33)
• About the restoration of the movie (11:13)
• Featurette: Il gattopardo - un viaggio nella memoria (20:46)
• 2 newsreels (3:01) (0:43)
• Gallery of customes, scenography and behind the scenes,
• Theatrical trailer
• 68 pages booklet (In Italian)
• 2-DVD Set (There is also an OOP LE edition which include a soundtrack CD)

 

DVD Release Date: 2001
Keep Case

Chapters 28

Release Information:
Studio: BFI Video

 

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 42,336,556,208 bytes

Feature: 39,466,144,704 bytes

Video Bitrate: 24.90 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:
• Full Feature Commentary by David

Forgacs and Rossana Capitano (optional subtitles)
• Interview with Claudia Cardinale (optional English subtitles) (9:53 in HD!)

Theatrical trailer in (3:16 in HD!)
• 
26-page liner notes booklet with essay by David Forgacs
 

Blu-ray Release Date: June 21st, 2010
Standard Blu-ray Case

Chapters 25

 

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

 

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 48,362,408,535 bytes

Feature: 47,573,385,216 bytes

Video Bitrate: 30.02 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:
• High-definition digital transfer, supervised by director of photography Giuseppe Rotunno, with restored image and sound and presented in the original Super Technirama aspect ratio of 2.21:1
The 161-minute American release, with English-language dialogue, including Burt Lancaster’s own voice
• Audio commentary by film scholar Peter Cowie
• A Dying Breed: The Making of The Leopard, an hour-long documentary featuring interviews with Claudia Cardinale, screenwriter Suso Ceccho D’Amico, Rotunno, filmmaker Sydney Pollack, and many others
• Video interview with producer Goffredo Lombardo
Video interview with professor Millicent Marcus on the history behind The Leopard
• Original theatrical trailers and newsreels
• Stills gallery of rare behind-the-scenes production photos
• PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by film historian Michael Wood

Blu-ray Release Date: June 29th, 2010
3-teired slipcase inside cardboard box

Chapters 32

Comments

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were ripped directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Criterion - Region 'A' Blu-ray - June 2010: Aside from some subtle color shifts I don't see a heck of a lot of differences in the BFI (Re-issue) and Criterion Blu-rays. Technically speaking the Criterion stats are more substantial - more disc space for the film and a higher bitrate - but if I was forced to choose I might lean slightly to the BFI. The UK company appears to have had a hands-off policy from the original, restored, source and in a very few instances their colors and contrast appear more robust. Criterion flesh tones still seem to have some orange hues - not unlike their DVD where BFI are a bit warmer in some spots. This is all pretty moot as if not for the side-by-side analysis both editions visually would be hard to distinguish from each other. Criterion have the "...supervised by director of photography Giuseppe Rotunno, with restored image and sound..." which is simply another positive to take into account. Bottom line is that both look fabulous - worthy of Blu-ray of the Year 2010 consideration. The Criterion, expectantly, doesn't have the moiring issue in the last hour that was part of the original BFI release. Most differences are extremely subtle and I be surprised if it impacted even the most hard-core fan of the film.

NOTE: The BFI faces are slightly fatter (horizontally stretched?) and the Criterion slightly thinner (vertically stretched?)

In the audio department - it is BFI that are a shade more buoyant with a slightly higher data transfer rate for their 2.0 channel lossless Italian language track. Criterion have stuck with the original mono, also in an uncompressed linear PCM track, and it is unnoticeably flatter. The DUB'ing can be obvious at times but we will assume that this is as technically authentic as The Leopard can sound at present. Both Blu-ray editions offer optional English subtitles (see samples below). Again though, I lean to the BFI in this feature - perhaps because it was the first 1080P transfer I saw (and re-watched for both the commentary and reissues). It is possible I got used to that font and hence find the larger Criterion slightly more intrusive. Again - this is about as picky as I can get.

Criterion have duplicated all that was in their mammoth 3-disc DVD package and the new hi-def includes a second Blu-ray disc to house the 161-minute American release, with English-language dialogue, including Burt Lancaster’s own voice. This is in HD but looks significantly weaker than the Italian language 1080P features from both sides of the pond (see sample below). It has damage and is very soft at times. Peter Cowie is one of the best commentarists in the business but I, must say that, really enjoyed the David Forgacs and Rossana Capitano discussions on the BFI disc. It was one of the most enjoyable commentaries I've ever heard. Criterion do stack their package with plenty of video extras including the hour long A Dying Breed: The Making of The Leopard and video interviews with producer Goffredo Lombardo and professor Millicent Marcus on the history behind The Leopard.

What can I say? - this is a film I have a certain obsession with now and I'm thrilled to have both Blu-ray editions looking and sounding so tremendous with the valuable extra features. For their specific 'region' both of these packages are essential in my mind - however I doubt there are too many who'd see the need to own both - although, in my opinion, the BFI commentary is worth it's price alone. No matter where you reside make sure this timeless title is part of your digital library.

NOTE: Sent in email from Dan D. : 'You stated: "The Leopard was originally shot in 35mm Technirama at 2.35:1, then blown up to 70mm Super-Technirama which has an aspect ratio of 2.21:1. This blowup results in a beautiful 70mm element but has the adverse effect of shaving off the sides by a slim margin. Since this picture was slated to be blown up to Super-Technirama, one can assume that Visconti and Rutonno framed their compositions with this in mind. So... what this means is, both the Criterion and the BFI DVD display the 70mm elements, in all the beautiful colour that gauge was capable of. If you're watching another (ex. Italian Medusa DVD) that displays a little more image on the right and left, then it's pretty clear this was made from the "restored 35mm print", containing a little more left and right, but faring far worse in overall colour, contrast, detail, grain, condition, etc..."

"In truth, it's really the other way around. According to Colin Bell of Technicolor-London, who worked on the 1992 restoration with DP Giuseppe Rotunno, THE LEOPARD was photographed in full-frame Technirama. This means that the negative image as photographed had an aspect ratio of 2.25:1. That 2.25 image would then be slightly cropped to print up at an AR of 2.21:1 in 70MM, or further cropped to an AR of 2.35:1 to make 35MM Anamorphic prints, as well as other formats. (As far as it’s known, the film was not exhibited in 70MM during its initial release.)

So, essentially, the 2.35:1 crop found on the Medusa disc (and others) was extracted from a 2.21:1 printable frame, rather than the reverse, as you stated it. Although cropping specs for Technirama are known to vary, according to Bell, 2.35:1 framing for THE LEOPARD was formatted by cropping the top of the horizontal frame. The Restoration doc on the Medusa disc goes into this in more detail.

The Criterion and BFI discs display something of a hybrid; their image is actually (for the most part) a 2.21 crop of the film's intended 2.35 framing, with a bit of panning-and-scanning to maximize essential action. When pressed, Criterion won't cop to their reasons behind doing this, only to say that Rotunno did approve their work. This reframing does, perhaps, allow for something of a more 'DVD-friendly' image. It may also (and this is only an educated guess) let them cover otherwise unavoidable distortion or damage at the side of the original image they were working from
.' (Thanks Dan!)

 - Gary Tooze

 

 

ADDITION: BFI - Region B Blu-ray (reissue - corrected) - April 2010: We are ecstatic to report the gamma issue reported on BFI's initial Blu-ray edition of The Leopard has been fully corrected!

We've included one sample capture comparisons with the 'flawed' issue to this pristine reissue below (dancing sequence). One can see the black-level problem is now gone. Judging by the technical stats and bitrate chart this is essentially the same wonderful transfer as initially released (exact same file size, time, audio, extras etc.) but the glitch at shifting to file 00011.m2ts (at 1:54:28.194) - has been totally rectified. It is now 'perfect'. 

Beyond the image, I'll simply repeat the below comments:

"Audio gives two options - Linear PCM 2.0 channel track Italian at 1536 kbps and an English Dolby Digital offering (commentary). It sounds almost as good as it looks with some range limitations in the original 2.0 channel stereo. Nino Rota's symphonic original score is a real beauty and it sound very nice with a crisp high-end and supportive bass response. There are optional English subtitles for the feature and the commentary as Rossana Capitano's beautiful accent may be a shade difficult from some to interpret at times.

 

Nothing new in the supplements - I had forgotten how informative this commentary (a Herculean project for the, staggeringly deep, 3 hour film) is - and we get the same 10-minute Cardinale interview (with optional subs) in HD but also now a 3:15 trailer in HD as well."

 

As most are aware Criterion will be releasing this, as well, in June HERE  for region A - but I can easily state that the BFI (reissue) is an essential Region 'B' Blu-ray. One of the best, and most beautiful, transfers I have ever seen. I should also state that I LOVE this commentary - something that is unique to the BFI. Criterion will undoubtedly use the exact same restored master. We will compare, as we always do, but I am thrilled with this BFI package. It gets our highest endorsement!

_________________________________________

For those you bought the original Blu-ray edition this Statement was issued by BFI:

THE LEOPARD - FAULTY DISC REPLACEMENT SCHEME

"As was highlighted in a detailed post on this forum (Criterion), BFIs November 2009 release of The Leopard on Blu-ray contained a fault which, unfortunately, affected the last third of the film. We are pleased to announce that this fault has now been fixed and that a new edition is shortly due for release. Further to this announcement, the BFI would like to offer those customers who purchased a faulty copy of the Blu-ray with a replacement disc.

Customers wanting to take advantage of this offer are asked to send the BFI only the faulty disc (please do not send the arrtwork, booklet or packaging) and to include details of their name, address and e-mail. Upon receipt of the faulty disc, BFI will post a replacement Blu-ray disc.

As a thank you for your patience and understanding on this matter (as well as in recognition of the fact that you will be incurring some postage fees), the BFI would also like to offer those customers returning faulty The Leopard Blu-ray discs a special discount price on any 2 Blu-ray or Dual Format editions released between now and December 2010. By redemption of a code, which will be supplied to you, you will be able to buy these editions at £10 each (inclusive of postage).

We would like to apologize for the frustration and disappointment that has been caused due to the original Blu-ray release of The Leopard and thank you once again for your patience during the period of time it has taken us to rectify the problem." (from BFI)

 - Gary Tooze

ADDITION: BFI - Region 'B' Blu-ray (original - flawed) - November 09: There are some issues about this release - so let's get them out of the way first. It has been reported that this disc has difficulty playing on modified Oppo Digital BDP-83 Blu-ray players. It supposedly has wobbly and / or jumpy movement that can corrupt the viewing experience. While I own the Oppo - I have been lazy to try region-free'ing firmware since I also own two Momitsu's (the 899 and 799) which are both region free by punching a code via the remote control. Oppo have been informed and may be working on a firmware fix. Secondly, this disc is currently only available from HMV in the UK. While we have considered becoming associated with this chain - I, and other ListServ members, have reported exorbitant shipping fees for international clients (this occurred while buying The Red Shoes when they had that 'exclusive'). It turned me off HMV completely and DVDBeaver does not endorse them. Luckily Amazon in the UK (one of the most reliable and customer friendly e-tailors in the world) have this listed for February of 2010. Plus there is another problem (see below).

How does it look on my Momitsus? Stunning with an imperfection in the last hour of the film. This is one of the more beautiful films I think I've ever seen - and certainly worthy of a 1080P transfer. Like the 2004 BFI DVD (of which this source is seemingly based) this is in the 2.21 aspect ratio. The entire spectrum of colors jumps to life with brighter more vibrant hues on Blu-ray. Detail takes a large step forward, grain is readily apparent and, despite the films extensive running time filling almost 40 Gig - with a mid 20's bitrate, the transfer encapsulates some real depth at times. While it supports the Criterion DVD transfer in appearance - absolutely everything I can judge is improved - and with a film of this grandeur - it can often be overwhelming. But.....

NOTE: The last Blu-ray disc file (14.5 Gig - 00011.m2ts) has a predominantly darker transfer than we've seen from the DVDs (see our ballroom screen grab below). Rest assured - we will investigate - but it almost looks like moiring at times as the black levels are so uncharacteristically pitch.

Audio gives two options - Linear PCM 2.0 channel track Italian at 1536 kbps and an English Dolby Digital offering. It sounds almost as good as it looks with some range limitations in the original 2.0 channel stereo. Nino Rota's symphonic original score is a real beauty and it sound very nice with a crisp high-end and supportive bass response. There are optional English subtitles for the feature and the commentary as Rossana Capitano's beautiful accent may be a shade difficult from some to interpret at times.

Nothing new in the supplements - I had forgotten how informative this commentary (a Herculean project for the, staggeringly deep, 3 hour film) is - and we get the same 10-minute Cardinale interview (with optional subs) in HD but also now a 3:15 trailer in HD as well.

My advice at this stage is to buy -> after investigating 00011.m2ts - we can concur with the report below:

Announcement by BFI: "We have investigated this issue thoroughly and can now confirm there is a problem on the first pressing of the BFI's Blu-ray edition of THE LEOPARD.

At 1:54.28 there is a significant change in black levels and contrast settings, evident from the first shot at this time code and remaining for the rest of the feature. This is demonstrated by a comparatively heavier look where blacks are crushed, whites are burnt out, the and the overall grain/noise structure becomes much more active - in short a rather abrupt and ugly gamma shift for the last 70+ minutes of the feature.

We are still investigating the source of the error with the facilities involved, but at present it seems that the fault can be traced to an error in the settings in one of the HD decks used during the final stages of this project. This has now been corrected, and the new pressing of THE LEOPARD will reflect this correction.

We appreciate the members of Criterion Forum for pointing out this issue to us. This is an error we certainly should have spotted before release, but this is a situation we've never encountered before, and the masters we signed off on were correct. Although we strive to be as careful as possible, occasionally human error rears its head. As Blu-ray technology develops, we find we're learning new things all the time.

As MichaelB has mentioned, we do read the forums regularly and take your comments very seriously. We work hard to ensure every title we release is delivered at the highest possible quality, but occasionally we may miss something. If there's a possibility that one of our releases contains a technical issue or fault, we will investigate thoroughly and work to correct it as soon as possible.

Thanks again for helping us out on this one and stay tuned for an announcement in the New Year regarding replacement of your LEOPARD Blu-rays, should you have purchased a copy from the first pressing
.".
  

***

 

ON THE DVDs: Criterion's transfer of the 70mm negative at Technicolor was in London 2003. They transferred this newly discovered element in High-Definition 24f, which would allow for equivalent down-conversion to both PAL and NTSC, so no transfer from NTSC to PAL would be necessary. BFI matched this image and the recent Italian restored soundtrack. The opticals were produced by Lee Kline from Criterion with Giussepe Rutonno, and set within the new 70mm transfer, after which BFI recieved the Pal clone of the finished HD Master.

 

Regarding aspect ratio, there is a lot of misinformation running around about this. The Leopard was originally shot in 35mm Technirama at 2.35:1, then blown up to 70mm Super-Technirama which has an aspect ratio of 2.21:1. This blowup results in a beautiful 70mm element but has the adverse effect of shaving off the sides by a slim margin. Since this picture was slated to be blown up to Super-Technirama, one can assume that Visconti and Rutonno framed their compositions with this in mind. So... what this means is, both the Criterion and the BFI DVD display the 70mm elements, in all the beautiful colour that gauge was capable of. If you're watching another (ex. Italian Medusa DVD) that displays a little more image on the right and left, then it's pretty clear this was made from the "restored 35mm print", containing a little more left and right, but faring far worse in overall colour, contrast, detail, grain, condition, etc...

 

We can dismiss the Medusa right away for its 35mm image that is faded and hazy.

 

The Criterion looks to have gone through a filtering of some sort and is slightly sharper than the BFI. The BFI commentary is wonderful and is a strong reason to choose this version or both this and the Criterion. I was less impressed by Peter Cowie commentary on the Criterion, but is also full of marvelous insight. Colors are accurate in both. Unless you are projecting on a large surface I think you would be happy (or even ecstatic) with either. It may be a case of personal preference and where you can get it most reasonably. The Criterion does offer the shorter release as well, if you are interested in that.

 - Gary Tooze

 


DVD Menus

(BFI - Region 2- PAL LEFT vs. Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - MIDDLE vs. Medusa - Region 2 - PAL - RIGHT)
 

 

 

BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 

 

Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 

Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray Second Disc


CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

Subtitle Sample

 

1) BFI - Region 2 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - SECOND

3) Medusa - Region 2 - PAL - THIRD

4) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray FOURTH

5) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


Screen Captures

 

1) BFI - Region 2 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - SECOND

3) Medusa - Region 2 - PAL - THIRD

4) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray FOURTH

5) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


1) BFI - Region 2 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - SECOND

3) Medusa - Region 2 - PAL - THIRD

4) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray FOURTH

5) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

Criterion's English Language HD Version on the second Blu-ray disc


 

1) BFI - Region 2 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - SECOND

3) Medusa - Region 2 - PAL - THIRD

4) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray FOURTH

5) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


1) BFI - Region 2 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - SECOND

3) Medusa - Region 2 - PAL - THIRD

4) BFI (roriginal) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray FOURTH

5) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray FIFTH

6) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

More Blu-ray Captures

 

1) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) BFI (re-issue) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 


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Report Card:

 

Image:

Blu-rays

Sound:

Blu-rays

Extras:

BFI (prefer commentary, but Criterion is stacked)

 

Box Covers

 

Distribution BFI
Region 2 - PAL

Criterion Collection

Region 1 - NTSC

Medusa
Region 2 - PAL
BFI
Region 'B' -
Blu-ray

Criterion Collection - Spine #235

Region 'A' - Blu-ray



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Gary Tooze